Kim Kardashian Shows Off Slimmed Body In See-Through Dress On ‘The Tonight Show’ (VIDEO)

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Health and Fitness – The Huffington Post
Kim Kardashian Shows Off Slimmed Body In See-Through Dress On ‘The Tonight Show’ (VIDEO)
Kim Kardashian had something to prove with her latest visit to “The Tonight Show,” and she did it by wearing a lace dress over black underwear — we know her underwear was black because the lace dress was more like an oversize doily that lleft virtually nothing to the imagination. Kardashian wanted to show the tabloids that called her fat that she was down 50 pounds.

According to the new mom, the weight gain, along with the accompanying media coverage, was “the greatest challenge of her life. “It was just really hard to read all these stories and hear all these nasty things. I think people sometimes … think I’m ‘in hiding’ now,” she said. “I just kind of wanted to adjust my life a little bit, ‘cause why would I subject myself to so much negativity, especially now that I have a daughter.”

She said that all the nasty press coverage surrounding her pregnancy has pushed her into a more private life with baby North and fiance Kanye West. And speaking of West, Kardashian said that he’ll be taking the lead on all of their wedding planning, with the couple aiming for an overseas ceremony in the summer.

Kim Kardashian just had her baby on “Keeping Up With the Kardashians,” airing Sundays at 9 p.m. ET on E! “The Tonight Show with Jay Leno” airs every weeknight at 11:35 p.m. ET on NBC.

TV Replay scours the vast television landscape to find the most interesting, amusing, and, on a good day, amazing moments, and delivers them right to your browser.

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Do We Own Our Memories?

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TED Weekends – The Huffington Post
Do We Own Our Memories?
Click here to watch the TEDTalk that inspired this post.

We like to think we own our memories — that no one can tamper with them or reveal their hidden contents. Emerging research suggests, however, that under certain circumstances, we can implant false memories, dampen the intensity of emotions associated with memories, and even reveal the content of memories people would prefer to keep secret. As we develop more effective ways to access and alter the memories of others, our memories start to seem less and less our own.

In her recent TEDTalk, Elizabeth Loftus described decades of research showing that we can alter existing memories and even implant false memories of events that never occurred. Subjects given misleading information that they got sick from eating strawberry ice cream in childhood were more likely, on average, to believe that they really were made sick by it than control subjects not given the information. The power of suggestion to alter memories has led many police departments to change their interrogation procedures to avoid inadvertently influencing witnesses. You might have thought we own our memories because no one can implant false ones. But that view is very much in doubt.

Pharmaceutical research suggests another way to tamper with memories. Propranolol, a beta blocker approved by the FDA to treat hypertension, may dampen the emotional intensity of memories of recent traumatic events. Small studies suggest that people who took propranolol after traumatic events like car accidents or assaults were less likely to subsequently develop symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder. If further studies show that propranolol or some other drug really can dampen memories, trauma victims seeking to recover damages for emotional distress may face some difficult choices. Someday defendants may say that they shouldn’t have to compensate trauma victims for emotional distress that could have been avoided with a pill. So you might have thought we own our memories because no one will ever be able to pressure us to pharmaceutically change them. Now that view is very much in doubt.

New methods of brain scanning suggest ways to assess memories despite efforts to conceal them. Several researchers are trying to use functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to detect lies. At least in artificial laboratory contexts, the research shows promise. There are probably ways to fool these techniques, and courts have yet to admit fMRI-evidence of deception. But give it time. One day, a suspect may lie and say that he never saw an alleged terrorist, but lie detection or other techniques to probe memories will suggest otherwise.

Moreover, under what I call the technological look-back principle, the fact that we may someday have good lie detection technologies already gives you reason to be wary. For if we are eventually able to detect lies with reasonable accuracy, we can ask you questions in the future about events that happened long before. In a sense, the technology will look back to events that predate it, just as we convict offenders for sexual assaults based on DNA evidence that predates modern DNA analysis.

While there is much debate in legal circles about whether lie detection technology could be used against a person in a criminal trial, there are lots of other ways the technology could be used both in and out of court. Politicians are not required to reveal their tax returns, but they frequently do so anyway. Perhaps someday their brains will be scanned for evidence of corruption. And sure, you can tell your spouse that you are always faithful, but if your spouse threatens to leave you unless you get scanned, well, your Fifth Amendment rights won’t help you. So you might have thought we own our memories because they will never be accessed unless we explicitly reveal them. That view, too, is very much in doubt.

I have argued elsewhere that we have a certain freedom of memory. It may include rights to dampen memories, enhance memories or memory-retention skills, keep memories private, and be free of certain invasions of our memories, like forced enhancement, forced dampening, or forced revelation. These rights arguably have limits, however. When memories are essential to protecting public safety, perhaps we can justifiably stop people from altering memories or keeping them private. But precisely how hard the law should strive to protect our memories aside, the view that our memories are necessarily our own — as some fact about the nature of memory — is one we may already need to forget.

Ideas are not set in stone. When exposed to thoughtful people, they morph and adapt into their most potent form. TEDWeekends will highlight some of today’s most intriguing ideas and allow them to develop in real time through your voice! Tweet #TEDWeekends to share your perspective or email tedweekends@huffingtonpost.com to learn about future weekend’s ideas to contribute as a writer.

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After scanning the brains of dogs, a scientist argues that they have emotions

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Health & Science: Science News, Health News, Scientific Developments, Healthcare & Nutrition – The Washington Post
After scanning the brains of dogs, a scientist argues that they have emotions

Canine brains

Do dogs have emotions?

“How Dogs Love Us” by Gregory Berns

Gregory Berns, an Emory University professor of neuroeconomics, normally studies the brains of people, using fMRI scans to figure out which stimuli motivate them. A news item about a bomb-sniffing dog got him wondering about canines: why they do what they do with and for us. Is it all about food? Or do they love us?

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The Real Genius of Genius Isn’t the Genius

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TED Weekends – The Huffington Post
The Real Genius of Genius Isn’t the Genius
Click here to read an original op-ed from the TED speaker who inspired this post and watch the TEDTalk below.

Genius doesn’t usually interest or impress me. My work in performance psychology has frequently exposed me to child prodigies and assorted other geniuses in academia, sports, and the performing arts, so perhaps I have become inured to the experience of people born with special gifts.

Also, I think genius is often overrated. I have known people who reached extraordinary heights despite seeming quite ordinary. They obviously had something special, but it wasn’t any innate propensity toward greatness in their chosen area.

I have also met unfulfilled genius, people who had tremendous gifts, yet failed to fully realize those gifts. Why? Some never knew they had a genius because they were never exposed to the area in which their genius lay.

Others never really connected with their gift, thus having no sense of ownership of it. That’s one problem with genius; geniuses often feel like it’s not truly theirs because they didn’t do anything to get it. Without this ownership, there is often no passion for the genius and there is little interest or incentive to take advantage of the genius.

Still others find that genius is more a cross to bear than a gift. For example, it causes them social ostracism by their peers or their parents turn the genius into a “weighted shackles” of expectation in which nothing is ever good enough. And they spend their lives trying to exorcise the genius from their souls.

I also don’t like to talk about genius because they didn’t earn their gifts. They got lucky and won the genetic lottery; good for them. Geniuses start out at the head of line early in life, giving them great advantage over us less fortunate mortals. But, as the saying goes, “life is a marathon, not a sprint,” and where you start doesn’t say always say much about where you finish.

I prefer to focus on aspects of their genius over which they have control. Do they possess the other attributes, such as passion, discipline, focus, and joy, that are necessary to see that genetic gift reach fruition? And let’s be realistic; geniuses are already ahead in the game, so, even if they don’t fully realize their gift, they will probably do just fine in life.

And I am even more concerned with the existential benefits of that genius, namely, whether and how they use their gift to enrich their own life and the lives of others. This is where Derek Paravicini comes in and where my real appreciation for genius lies.

Born three-and-half months premature, Derek was behind the eight ball from day one of his life. He was lost his sight shortly after birth and, as his parents learned later, he was also severely autistic. His chances of “making it” in life were a statistical improbability. Yet, Derek demonstrated an early talent for the piano and has become a world-renowned pianist.

I would argue that Derek’s experience of life, though seemingly vastly different than us normal folks, differs really as a matter of degree, not kind. — Dr. Jim Taylor

This is where genius gets interesting. What fascinates me about Derek is not that he was born with this special talent to play the piano. Instead, that there was something — was it also genetic or was it communicated to him by his parents? — that pushed him to own his gift and to devote himself to developing it to its extraordinary conclusion. In doing so, Derek found meaning, satisfaction, and joy in a life that was, in the beginning, heading toward a life quite the opposite.

Also, autistic people have significant difficulties connecting with others because they lack the capacity to express their own emotions normally or read emotions in others. Yet, Derek used his music to express his own emotions and to elicit emotions, such pleasure, wonder, and hope, from other people. In doing so, he developed relationships with others that few so-called normal people could equal.

I would argue that Derek’s experience of life, though seemingly vastly different than us normal folks, differs really as a matter of degree, not kind. So what can those of us who lie closer to the center of that continuum of experience — I mean that both positively (most of us don’t have his challenges) and negatively (most of us don’t have his gifts) — learn from Derek?

Well, it doesn’t really matter what challenges we have (we all have some to varying degrees) or what gifts we have (and we all have some of those too). What matters is what we choose to do with them. We can surrender to our challenges and, in doing so, to life itself. Or we can confront those challenges, accept them, and do our best to surmount them.

We can also not seek out and embrace our own personal genius and, in doing so, miss out on the potential richness of our life. Or, we can acknowledge our own personal gifts, however mundane or extraordinary they may be, and pursue their fruition with gusto. From that process — not the gifts themselves — will we, like Derek, find meaning, satisfaction, joy, and connection in life. That, I believe, is the true genius of Derek and it is a genius that we all possess.

Ideas are not set in stone. When exposed to thoughtful people, they morph and adapt into their most potent form. TEDWeekends will highlight some of today’s most intriguing ideas and allow them to develop in real time through your voice! Tweet #TEDWeekends to share your perspective or email tedweekends@huffingtonpost.com to learn about future weekend’s ideas to contribute as a writer.

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Administration official Marilyn Tavenner apologizes for HealthCare.gov problems

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Health & Science: Science News, Health News, Scientific Developments, Healthcare & Nutrition – The Washington Post
Administration official Marilyn Tavenner apologizes for HealthCare.gov problems

The Obama administration official directly responsible for the troubled rollout of the federal health insurance Web site apologized Tuesday, promising to fix problems that have prevented many consumers from signing up for coverage under President Obama’s health-care law.

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